Evidence-Based Practices 

NAK Union Behavioral Health is based on the proven recovering addicts strategies of both partner engagement and multiple-phased programming. A 2008 Urban Institute Study examined research, promising practices, and the “best thinking” from the field to develop 13 of strategies that promote effective and achievable approaches to community supervision[1]. Strategy Number 7- Engage Partners to Expand Intervention Capacities states that agencies can implement most, if not all, of these strategies, but they cannot fully succeed at transforming re-entry in isolation. The strategy specifies that full transformation will require a commitment from a consortium of stakeholders- corrections; parole agencies; law enforcement; and other nontraditional partners, such as health and human service providers, housing authorities, workforce development boards, faith-based organizations, and formerly incarcerated people who have already begun to address their issues as part of their work in communities. In the first few weeks and months, supervision should provide a “bridge” of interventions and case management strategies targeting individual-level risk and need.

Given the substantial treatment, health, housing, education, and employment needs of the parole population, it is essential for parole supervision agencies to partner with other government and private agencies, including community health care providers, housing authorities, substance-abuse counselors, mental health service providers, workforce development boards, faith-based organizations, and other relevant groups. These agencies increasingly recognize aspects of the re-entry problem as their own and have specialized expertise to be effective. Potential partners such as community political leaders, faith-based leaders, and extended family members, make up a local culture that can support each individual’s successful readjustment, fail to support such adjustment, or even create problems that hinder successful reintegration.

A 2011 Pew Report examining re-entry programs concluded that strong community supervision programs for lower-risk, nonviolent recovering addicts not only cost significantly less than incarceration but, when appropriately resourced and managed, can cut recidivism by as much as 30%[2]. According to some researchers an ideal model re-entry program should include three or more phases designed to transition into a normal life.  The first phase should begin in the institution with service delivery congruent with the patient’s needs. The patient’s risks and needs may change significantly as he or she enters the community context. Ideally, the individual should continue in treatment services and case plans should be updated as needed. The final phase is an aftercare or relapse prevention phase where clients would receive ongoing support and services to address their needs. While this model may provide the overall structure necessary to implement an effective re-entry program, the process and services offered by these programs is key to success. More importantly, these “ideal” elements are included in the NAK Union Behavioral Health Program emulates this model by not only proposed in this application. 

Selection of Evidence-Based Model

Our model was selected to align with the efforts of the Georgia various Departments and foster a smooth transition between the GDC and NAK Union Behavioral Health for recovering addicts.  Because we are replicating the GDC model, which is a proven evidence-based model, we will ensure success of the program within the state and align with state of Georgia goals. 

Proposed Practice Impact on Population Issues 

Demographics-Nak Union Behavioral Health Recovering is specifically targeted to Metro Atlanta counties with the highest rates of ex-recovering addicts. Because of this rate of re-entry, current resources are extremely strained and many recovering addicts lack the level of support needed to be successful. This is particularly true for the Recovering addicts’ population, which has very unique needs after release from incarceration due to the likely existence of psychological, physical, or other issues. 

Language and Literacy-Nak Union Behavioral Health will partner with community resources aimed at improving language and literacy in adult populations. This need will be assessed upon enrollment in our program and appropriate referrals made. We anticipate this targeted support to have a great impact on our target population, as 100% of participants in need of these supports will receive a referral. 

Sexual Identity-Nak Union Behavioral Health will partner with community resources that support Sexual Identity issues in the Metro Atlanta area. This need will be assessed upon enrollment in our program and appropriate referrals made. We anticipate this targeted support to have a great impact on our target population, as 100% of participants in need of these supports will receive a referral. 

Disability-Nak Union Behavioral Health will not only serve recovering addicts with all types of disabilities but also link them with community resources and benefits as appropriate, as 100% of participants in need of these supports will receive a referral.

 


[1] Brazzel, Diana. 2008. From Classrooms to the Community. Urban Institute.

[2] Pew Center on the States, 2011. State of Recidivism.